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. it is a surprise exercise of combat readiness. agoas planned a long time with the defense ministry -- they told me about it earlier. he had all the orders ready. exercise has been finished. yesterday, i ordered the troops to return to their military bases. what could trigger a possible use of military force? it is only an extreme case. the legitimate president requested russia to use the military force to defend the lives and health of ukrainians. --major concern is the situation that is happening. so many nationalists and radical rampant on the streets of kiev. the news media was chained on a square. handcuffed to some fixture. it was freezing cold. he was holed up in a basement and tortured. how do you define that? is this democracy? is this an expression of democracy? if all authorities are corrupt -- he has not been able to rob anything. there was none there. there was just one technical guide their -- there. i am an i.t. guy. could you let a woman out? he was shot dead right there. second i.t. guy was forced into the basement. he was burned alive. what we see that, we realize what the major c
dispute processes that are based on decisions on the merits and not technical defenses. there was a great burst of activity in the american community. the national gallery, nancy returned a piece of art, which they found which was well-known, at the chicago art institute, and others. but then what happened is, after a terrific momentum creating a search engine, so a claimant wouldn't have to go to one or different museums in the united states, they could buy one going into we go to all 100 museums. all of this was done, christie's and sotheby's established and still have full-time employees who look for any suspect art, and i was in any given year a dozen are returned and won't be sold. but here's what happened, and it's a shame. is that momentum was lost. the leadership of the u.s. show really began to dissipate, and the museums overtime started to assert technical defenses when claims were made like, for example, the statute of limitations has run. they even preemptively filed injunction suits to prevent claims before they were made. they said they did it after researching it themselves
on the table. that's what secretary of defense, chuck hagel, delivered today. we are going to send an aircraft wing that's been in poland, a nato ally to the west of ukraine, that's going to be extended. the u.s. is going to send more aircraft to the baltic state, north of the ukraine, also nato allies. more aircraft there. he is going to convenient nato ministers to talk about the next step. you have the carrot and the stick. if this doesn't change, the situation on the ground doesn't change, costs are going to be imposed. at the same time, we are going to demonstrate our commitment to those nato allies. you see them there, the ones in green along ukraine's western poured der. . >> jim sciutto live and michael holmes, we do have some breaking news right now from capitol hill. as jim was saying, what is being most used right now, words and statements. diplomacy in this crisis. there are about to be some words and statements coming from the u.s. congress. >> our deirdra walsh just spoke with ed royce, chairman of the foreign committee in the house. he said tomorrow that committee will hold a vo
controlled senate. he was controversial because of his involvement in the defense of a convicted cop killer, everyone voting against the nomination. here is the clempbler. they voted along with these seven democrats. either the first time it's gone down since they changed filibuster rule. anchor of special report. this is a stinking rebuke of the obama administration. >> the fact that senator harry reid, senate majority leader would put up this vote, and they had vice president joe biden up there ready to cast the tie vote for democrats to get him through if it was a a tie. remember, this vote goes down even after democrats changed the rules in the senate. remember the nuclear option. it was changed from 60 votes to get cloche you're to a simple majority, 50 plus one, 51. after vote know, senator reid added his vote to bring it back up. eight democrats voted no. the nomination went down. century you have democrats who voted know, republicans pointing to another eight who voted yes for this nomination they are probably going to take it in the midterms as an issue, a political issue, especial
, was to enhance the defense of our military facilities because they are constantly receiving threats, and we were aware of the armed nationalists moving in. now, russia has well-trained, well-equipped, now additional 16,000 or more, and vladimir putin was worried about enhancing the defense of his military facilities because they were constantly receiving threats. there is something i'd like to stress, however, he goes on to say. obviously, what i am going to say now is not within my authority, and we do not intend to interfere. however, we firmly believe that all citizens of ukraine, i repeat, wherever they live should be given the same equal right to participate in the life of their country in determining its future. my friends, we are seeing justification for intervention and serious intervention in eastern ukraine. so he goes on to further questions, and then he goes on to take a shot at the united states, saying our partners, especially in the united states, always clearly formulate their own geopolitical and state interests and follow them with persistence, then using the principle -- quote
's defense ministry, is part of the military drills that were began yesterday. nothing to do with what is going on in ukraine, according to the russian government. that is clearly not believed by the ukrainian interim government, which is concerned about the penalty of russian aggression. so concerned that it has warned russia that a movement of its fleet, based in crimea, would be seen by the ukrainian interim government as a sign of aggression, and the ukrainian foreign ministry summoned the russian-charged affair for immediate emergency consultation. russia at the moment does not have an ambassador in kiev because he was recalled to moscow. this is a signal of how tense things are at the moment. >> it must be tense because, as we well know, ukraine is absolutely vital to president putin - not just historically, but geopolitically as well. how does moscow regard what is happening in ukraine now, and keeping a close eye on crimea? >> yes, well it's not just the geopolitical importance of ukraine to russia that matters, it's the emotional importance. we have spoken to russians on the s
of the department of defense. which is the office of research and engineering. that became the defense advanced research project which is the subject of my next book. a shameless plug. yes you. [applause] >> see talked about the russian and was there a reason for this? remapped they couldn't stand the german scientist. and that's a very interesting question. but they sent them back to germany and we had a program that was called operation dragon return. and we scooped up anyone who had been in the soviet union working on the weapons program and use them as intelligent asset area. >> is it true that allen dulles was sort of the front man and he was setting up the cia? >> good question. he was at camp king and he was the head heller soviet intelligence program on the soviet union intelligence program. he became a major player in all of this, sadly. and his story is interwoven into this, but he is at camp king with his team of officers and former intelligence agents and they were all run by the army intelligence and the cia took them over. so then the soviet spies who were talking to them and subj
the ports. and today, they took over two strategic defense areas, defense missile systems. it appears now they control just about everything. well, overnight, united states time, my crew and i flew down to crimea to get a look on the ground and we'll begin where we landed. we arrived at the airport midday. and everything seemed pretty normal. nobody bothering you, nobody asking questions, nobody staring you down in any strange way. the weather much better here than in the north. and then, over here at this gate that leads out of the airport, a man who professes to be a local from simferopol who is volunteering, with volunteer equipment, things that belong to himself, but one difference you might notice here, see the brand-new scotch tape on the fence post here holding up what is a brand-new russian flag. the changes are subtle. they are not in any way oppressive. but they're here. >> i saw the victims for the first time in my life and i was scared. >> she grew up here. last week when the russians arrived, she was frightened. >> i thought that it was the beginning of maybe war and an expec
peninsula are not actually russians at all but instead members of local self-defense groups. that came as a surprise to many people with eyes and/or ears because they sure look like russian troops firing warning shots at hundreds of ukrainian soldiers attempting to reenter an air base on crimea that the russians have seized. so far this is the only known instance of shots fired between the two groups, but there are forces such as these in the streets of crimea's regional capital patrolling with no identification. today the administration said that the u.s. cannot yet prove that these forces are russian. >> it's pretty clear that they're russian troops. >> i think it's clear, but general dempsey, what evidence do we have. we don't have any evidence as yet. i think evidence could likely become available over time. >> just as an fyi, several of those troops have told reporters that they are russian. meanwhile, nato is cutting back its ties with russia, suspending its first joint mission to escort a u.s. ship as part of efforts to disarm syria. nato says forget about any more meetings with
media quoting ukrainian defense saying this happened, but you have the russian defense ministry saying this didn't happen. can you clear this up for us? >> we have conflicting reports and russian media reporting this deadline was set at 5:00 local time tomorrow to surrender or face a storm of russian military force in response. we have spoken to defense officials who say yes, there was an ultimatum. the commander thwarted one of the vessels that blocked in the harbor there. and we are told that the forces have three choices. they can swear allegiance and surrender or face an attack. now a denial through russian state media from the black sea fleet. the russian black city fleet that there was any such ultimatum. we are being told that these ultimatums have been regular and constant since russian troops first showed up. at various military bases and installations across that region. russian forces have been saying we have a limited time. they have not been enforced. we have russian lawmakers dealing with a necations of territory. tell us about that. >> so a group of members of the russia
there are russian defense forces. kerry was god smacked. nbc's andrea mitchell told him putin said that. putin says there's an illegitimate government here in kiev. kerry says how can it be illegitimate when the parliament approved this government? putin says there are ant anti-semantic running in kiev. kerry says, i drove through kiev, i walked through kiev, how can that be the case, mr. putin? but let's look at the positive side of things. progress, kerry is going to be speaking to lavrov. nato and the russians will be speaking, as well. it's sluggish, but there is a ministerial level conversation going on. the russians maybe, despite mr. putin's comments about the illegitimatesy of this government, there was some progress there. but the hard proof is there are russian forces or pro russian forces, whatever you want to call it, on ukraine territory. talking about putin's speech yesterday, this is hard lined. it says the confessions of a mad adegreeson with a caricature of mr. putin. a humanitarian mission? and then we have a third bun referring to those shots and pictures of unarmed ukrainian air
by ukraine's riot police. she is a member of one of the self defense unit that are protecting the square. >> the image i will never forget are the faces of friends facing riot police. we were a small group and the police three times bigger. we had no weapons, just stones and molotov cocktails. i didn't think the police would kill ukrainians. >> victoria was wounded when a hand grenade handed next to her. now that yanukovych is gone, ukrainians are getting to know more on the men victoria helped to overthrow. >> just before leaving, the aid threw the documents in the river. there are still people diving in the freezing cold water trying to retrieve every single document they can. >> about 40,000 documents have been moved to a guest house by a group of ukrainian journalists who are sifting through them and making them available on line for everyone to see. many more are still drying in the sauna. some of the documents reveal a lavish lifestyle and a taste for expensive furniture. others detail transbackses through a web of shadow companies and a bank belonging to yanukovych's son, alexande
plan came in mid-january when the defense minister called kerry messianic. he was strongly condemned to the comments, but his words convey the difficulty ahead. >> doug, thank you. >>> thousands of anti-government activists marched peacefully to venezuela's capital today, trying to maintain that movement's momentum. afterwards, several hundred protesters erected barricades, burned tires and threw rocks and fireworks at national guard troops. they responded with tear gas. it's become a near nightly ritual for about two weeks. two people were e runner oscar pistorius' murder trial is under way in south africa. the olympian pleaded not guilty to murdering his girlfriend. he said he shot reeva steenkamp by mistake last valentine's day, thinking she was an intruder. a witness testified in court today she heard gunshots and blood curdling screams. prosecutors believe the world famous athlete shot his girlfriend after a fight and tried to paint a picture at the trial of a loud argument before the fatal shots. >>> one member of congress gets a fashion makeover. wait until you see why. >>> if
it, quote, local defense units. putin continued to deny that russian troops have invaded ukraine. putin had this to say about what he called the united states meddling in the region. i sometimes have an impression that there's some laboratory in the u.s. where they conduct experiments using these countries as rats, and they do not understand the consequences. president obama said this about vladimir putin today. >> there have been some reports that president putin is pausing for a moment and reflecting on what's happened. i think that we've all seen that from the perspective of the european union, the united states, allies like canada and japan and allies and friends and partners around the world, there is a strong belief that russia's action is violating international law. i know president putin seems to have a different set of lawyers making a different set of interpretations, but i don't think that's fooling anybody. i think everybody recognizes that although russia has legitimate interests in what happens in a neighboring state, that does not give it the right to use force as
clinic. secretary of the defense chuck hagel defended the proposal budget presented on the hill bringing military spending down by $400 billion. by 2015. but hagel said the cuts will not effect the military's ability to protect the united states. >> meeting our national security needs under constrained budgets. we focus on the balance. the balance that will be required to bend this country going forward. after more than a decade of long large stability operations we exchange the capacity to modern indication capabilities as we shift to focus on future requirements. these are shaped by enduring and emerging threats. >> well, ground forces will see the most cuts but the new budget protects investments into new technologies, vehicles. one of those projects is the joint striker fighter. but the program is way over budget so the military's plans are being scaled back. >> reporter: the joint strike fighter better known as the f 35 is supposed to be all things to all branches of the u.s. military. able to evade military radar, capable of super sonic speed and being able to land and take off lik
been increasing military maneuvers it's based on the korean peninsula. that prompted nato defense ministers meeting in brussels to issue a stern warning to moscow now ukraine's new prime minister i say me get things set me up says he's focusing on the political solution urging russia to cooperate with ukraine. this is the man whose task it is to lead ukraine autobots crisis. pro european politician are singing gets a new parliament confirmed him as a new prime minister by a nearly unanimous margin. on the night and gets a new show himself to be a tough advocate of afro european courts. something he plans to stick it in his new office to show them so the new european integration as the central topic of the ukrainian government. it means visa free travel for ukrainian citizens. that means an agreement with the eu on political and economic integration with the free trade agreement. yet singles is only thirty nine years old but he's already served as parliamentary speaker. economics minister and foreign minister maliki faces gigantic problems political instability and billions in tax
the distinguished civilian service award which is the highest award that the department of defense can give to a non uniformed person. to understand "operation paperclip" you really must go back to the fall of 1944. that was a very dark time. this was a rise and fall of the third reich. landing at normandy pushing to munich and berlin. among the soldiers are scientist with the u.s. military. they are part of a secret mission to find what they call atomic biological chemical weapons. abc weapons. the real threat but city will who was the head of the operation was a particle physicist learn to sitting in the abandoned apartment in november 1944 that the atomic program telling him his minister of armaments atomic science is jewish science. said don't concentrate on that. i am paraphrasing. >> in what they learned was that the third reich was experimenting and humans. said he was pulled from concentration camps. this is the first time to american military intelligence. >> and he came across in a letter director of the third reich is very difficult to imagine that later he became part of "operation paper
's defense ministry as they called for an end to the conflict with ukraine yesterday russian president led them if putin said russia was of the rights to use or options to protect compact ritz you're living in terror in ukraine the force was not needed for now. pitching to know what the russian armed forces would direct indication of the seas yet the crimea saying the uniformed troops without national insignia when local self defense forces. on the ground in crimea a predominantly russian speaking pinion steering the bike seat tension remained high. russian forces fired warning shots in a confrontation with ukrainian service men and russian navy ships reported to be paid in the strait separating the ukrainian backseat peninsula from russia fan. a georgia man accused of being a russian intelligence agent went on it royally nice temple on monday for his alleged involvement in the mother of six home and check to separatists killed in a wave of assassinations in technique two of them and both of them russian citizens are acknowledging being tried in a sentient the prosecutors said in his openi
of other dramatic cuts in the defense budget over the first five years of his administration. and i'm talking now exit wars in iraq and afghanistan. cuts to the base levels of the budget. i think it's consistent with his ideology. i think is he very deliberately trying to down size our military capabilities to make the united states, in his view, less provocative in the world. >> all right. he made a statement, the president did, that you cited in one of the interviews you did with fox news, that having this close colossus army invites terrorism, invites people to attack it on its face, that's true. if you send a big army in to a place like iraq or into a place like afghanistan then all the bad guys in the region come in to try to attack the army. all right? so i didn't think it was a diminishment of power statement. it seemed to me to ablow jis particular call statement. let's do it another way or am i wrong? >> well, i think it's wrong, historically. he said this in the state of the union message just last month that got very little attention that long term deployments may ultimat
seen here in red. there you see it in the middle of the screen. ukraine's defense minister says they have warned officials to swear allegiance to the new crimean authorities, surrender, or face an attack. but russian media now saying reports of a russian ultimatum are, quote, utter rubbish. what we know right now is about 6,000 russian troops are in control of crimea. the european union demanding an immediate russian withdrawal. the secretary of state, john kerry, he's due to fly out tonight, to go to kiev in ukraine. he spoke moments ago at the state department, and he condemned russian's invasion of crimea as an incredible act of aggression. in moscow, russian's parliament is considering legislation that could ultimately lead to the annexation of crimea as russian territory. the russian president putin appears to be taking a very active role in military drills in western russia. the exercises involve about 150,000 troops, along with aircraft and ships. putin called for snap drills and surprise inspections throughout the region. let's go straight to the region, cnn's anderson c
our defense and cutting the army to the smallest we have had since world war ii. with uic americans who want our country to be engaged in events beyond our borders. i see americans who want an internationalist foreign policy. i see americans who want our country to stand with israel and our other partners. i see americans who are willing to spend their hard-earned tax dollars on effective foreign assistance and to strengthen the greatest military the world has ever known. i see here today americans who want america to lead. i have been around a long time. since the coolidge administration. you i have never seen this world in need of strong american readership than it is today. of these the events negotiations with iran which i hope to succeed but i doubt, when i see the slaughter in syria, when i see the chinese inserting themselves in asia, when i see significant cuts in foreign aid and also in our defense budget, i'm worried. my final word to you my dear and beloved friends, america -- israel needs you more today than ever before. thank you and god bless. [applause] >> senator jo
they have formed self-defense teams and took over the control of military bases. when i saw yesterday what they have taken over, they -- there are 22,000 troops and a lot of arms. but as i said, without a single shot, it is now in the hand of the ukrainian people. the people who were blocking -- >> let's get back out of this now and explain what's happened so far. from what we've heard so far, let's just go other the headlines. he's been speaking about 20 minutes now. we believe he's entertaining legitimate questions. he says this is a wrongful coup that has happened, that yanukovych was wrongful ly ousted. that the idea of sanctions should be very carefully examined because they will hurt everyone and all options are on the table for him. the first question, it seems that crimea is not the oend, ony the beginning. >> right. seems to me this is availed threat. he's saying unless i have a seat at the table in deciding what's going to happen in the future of the government of ukraine, we reserve the right to go further into russian ukraine. he's really giving no evidence of that. i think wha
the crisis. defense secretary hagel takes heat up on capitol hill but says the u.s. is suspending military exercises with russia and will step up training with poland's military. we have full coverage beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way fo
with them. some of these candidacies were hrown out. so it means the minister of defense is a professional military man. e was supported by the people, and he is respected in the rmy. in the security, supporters from the opposition, his candidacy is supported by the people. and he used to be the chief of ecurity during a time. and the minister of the nterior. so people demonstrated their support, their full support in the ministry. they got those who were professional people. we count on that. the second question is very painful for me, because i don't want to think about any kind of military development around the settlement of the question. but i think -- i think we are strong enough to defend ourselves. we have a strong feeling, we have a spiritual feeling that we are right in what we are doing. >> can you talk about the resolution invoking the international criminal court? did this come up, and also the request to extradite mr. yanukovych back? what are the status of those actions? >> you can find the experts on how this works. well, it's not so easy to move directly. o what do we have
ryan is a former defense attache in moscow. and director for defense at the belfer center for science and international affairs at harford university, and william taylor, former ambassador to ukraine in 2006 and 2009. he's working at the university any of peace. >> russians are a significant player in hot spots around the world, syria, iran and afghanistan. geopolitically we need russia's collaboration. what does the worsening collaboration mean for the u.s.? >> i question whether we need russia's collaboration. it's not clear they've been helpful in afghanistan, or they've done anything extraordinary on the iranian negotiations or anything helpful in syria - if anything, the opposite. we don't have to worry that much about offending russia. we should focus on ukraine. the russians have a direct threat. we have interests there, that's the reason we should be focussed. russia's obinstructionism caused us to have little progress. don't we need them to improve matters? >> i don't think we have to sacrifice ukraine to change their behaviour, which is not helpful under the current circumst
border, which of course is shared with ukraine and the defense minister just a few minutes ago said there are russian fighter jets involved in that. is that a show of muscle or a preplanned exercise? all of this has the united states, nato very concerned. talking about the need for yause to stay out of ukraine d not by -- do not get militarily involved in any way. the situation in crimia, mainly a russian-speaking group of people. when viktor yanukovych was in power, they were talking about the western regions. now that the opposition is in power, the concern is they could get sort of lose out if you will in this carefully -- ethnic mix within the ukraine. nteresting developments today. the regional parliament building in crimia. >> tell us what is going on in the building. we're waiting to see this new government formed. this new leader step forward. an interim government but an important one given the financial situation. >> i'll tell you exactly what's happening. i'm inside the parliament. right in front of me is the man that the opposition said they want to be prime minister. su
, would you expect russia to come to their defense? >> the russians are coming off a pretty successful olympics. i do not think they want to provoke the type of international incident. but it is very fluid. there would be pressure for russians to come to the defense over the russian speaking population. the black sea fleet is going to be a big issue. >> scarlet, you have some important breaking news. >> we just got results from sears. $3.30 per share. revenues are in line with estimates. sales are down 6.4%. other company news. set to report. the annual report could be released this saturday. lego topping its rivals in asia. rose by theo single digits in the u.s. and europe and double digits elsewhere. don't take jamie dimon lightly. a j.p. morgan spokesman says he was saying that market volume is unpredictable at times like the weather. that is today's company news. we are focused on what happened overnight in crimea. >> we certainly are. >> that leads us to our twitter question. as vladimir putin part of the solution, part of the problem, how does he fit into the puzzle? tweet us. th
.s. government money at all in that panel so that these disputes could be done without the technical defenses. i am sad to say that after the passage of 50 years of the event revived it through the washington principles that we have really fallen back, stagnated and we need to get back into fulfilling what the monument data. that would be the attribute to the monument is to get back to where we were then. >> what is the committee doing and can you make it short please? ddmac i would respectfully disagree and i just thought we needed a commission in the united states and those that are set up in your car for a totally different category that were recovered after the war and were known to have some kind of issue and in the custody of those countries. the objects in the american collection are hereby happenstance and what the community has done since the conference, which the ambassador was so instrumental in is adopting these guidelines for the research publications that they are misleadingly simple guidelines into the research for it sample in the museum this specific research into the world war
gates, former secretary of defense for both president bush and president obama. >> putin is i think a very rational person in the framework of what he's trying to achieve. but there is no doubt david brooks has it right, there is this incredibly strong thread through much of russian history of russia having a special mission in the world, of russia being the third rome, if you will. it goes back centuries. so there is this -- you know, we talk about american exceptionalism. the russians have their own version of it in this regard. >> charlie: and then from kiev by skype, the former president of georgia, mikheil saakashvili. >> this is something that is bigger and the longer it lasts the bigger it will get. so there's a desperate need for leadership now on the parts of the united states administration and european leaders indeed because this is not just business as usual. on the other hand, i'm also, in a way have this hope that this will be one of the last adventures of vladimir putin. >> charlie: and we conclude this evening with a conversation with jeffrey goldberg of bloomberg vi
, big cuts for a leaner military. so right now defense secretary chuck hagel is testifying before the senate armed services committee, defending cuts to the army and the marines. hagel also told lawmakers, martin dempsey spoke with his russian counterpart today. he urged russia to show continued restraint in the days ahead to show a diplomatic solution. >>> secretary jack lew answers questions on the president's 2015 spending plan. >>> same-sex marriage supporters are riding a wave of momentum. according to a new "washington post"/abc news poll, 50% believe the constitution's guarantee of equal protection gives gays the right to marry. this coincides with attorney general saying gay couples can apply for marriage licenses, even though same-sex marriage doesn't become legal in that state until june. in kentucky, democrats split on the issue. steven bashir said he is hiring outside attorneys to defend the state's same-sex marriage ban. >>> coming up, president obama calling on governors to call for backup when it comes to raising the minimum wage. we'll be talking to connecticut's g
. it prohibits economic coercion. to the guarantors required come to your defense? unfortunately, in history the russian federation tried to suppress us with economic tools. we use the arguments of these agreements. it did not work. the europeanday, states,, united the guarantors -- they are ready to provide assistance and financial systems. your first question -- we have had no clear answer for my statement. long beforeppeared the duma took the positions of today. this action has been prepared long before. it was a well-prepared action. why my feeling and position is that the provisions of the charter, the mechanisms and principles of the security council were violated severely. they destroyed the to demonstrate while the -- without any consultations with anybody. -- itecided to protect was a mistake in the statement of one of the colleagues. the decision was taken not to protect the at make russians but the russian speaking population. if you speak russian, you are to be protected by the russian federation. >> because the deputy harry secretary says this is the time you wereeads, calm, ask
reserves to himself the right to intervene militarily at any time anyplace in ukraine, not just in defense of rugs, but also in defense of ukraineens. that's essentially a cart blanche to invade any country. >> saying he reserves the right to protect his people as if ukraine is still part of the old soviet union. >> putin has never like so many other russian elites accepted the legitimacy of an independent ukraine and he as far as he's concerned doesn't even consider ukrainians to be a separate people. essentially, he's marching in to defend his own. he also said and this is absolutely shocking, that he is "not worried by war." no leader other than adolf hitler and perhaps the ruler of north korea would say that kind of thing in today's world. >> should we be worried about vladimir putin's mental capacities or are we seeing a situation where some suggest we are looking at a russian leader who is isolated and insulated and only speaks to people who tell him what he wants to hear? >> i think it's both. clearly he is insulated, isolated, although at the same time, do keep in mind the russian
that the pentagon and the joint chiefs, the secretary of defense right now are going through all the scenarios and the options for the use of force. clearly, it's premature for us to even talk about the use of force. however, it is a possible outcome and needs to be planned, and it is what i would describe very robust detail. so a lot of options are out there. clearly, the united states as a first order would have to have what's known as a command and control type capability so if a decision was made to apply force, it's going to be a joint force. all the services and the different combat and commands will be involved and it will require some element that will allow you to tie it all together. that's taking place right now in terms of discussions in what's known as warning orders, in order to posture us, to make sure we're prepared. but all this is premature because there are other elements of power that have to be addressed and have to be exhausted. if the united states has declared and determined that this is in their national interest to get involved in some way, or to simply allow this to
of the national defense council. and i spoke to one of the representatives of that council, deputy summer somer about the intentions of the russians. let's just listen in to what she thought. >> we understand that this is main goal of the russian army to -- ukrainian army to have its own country. but just now, we don't have any cases with -- where our on -- >> do you fear that there's going to be an escalation of the conflict area outside of crimea to, perhaps, eastern ukraine, for instance, which has a lot of russian support, we're told? >> so dangerous of escalation is very high. but ukrainian government try to keep the situation and our message for all ukrainian army to give the people. we understand that we are doing everything without armed forces. >> do you consider russian actions so far to be a declaration of war by russians on ukraine? >> yes. we can see the decision of the russian parliament and we can see act on the ukrainian territory in crimea. >> what they're saying here is the actions on the ground that have been a declaration of war. we've had a mobilization of regular forces, a
federal position was at the defense department. i know you have not been at dhs long, but i'm sure you have noticed that the level of command and control to what you may have become uh cuss -- accustomed to is not at dhs. you experienced potentially damaging results of the structural defect. the fact that an acquisition solicitation was significant privacy implication was published without approval by dhs or the awareness of ice leadership is very troubling. your immediate predecessor promoted the concept of one dhs, one structural changes that persist to when 22 independent officers and agencies were essentially thrown together under one roof. as you have undoubtedly learned by now, dhs components essentially function as independent entities. all too often components see directors from headquarters as advisory. this has to stop. for one dhs to truly have meaning components must adhere to department-wide policies and mandates and i appreciate your position when the chairman and i had a meeting with you that you basically committed to making that happen as well as making sure that the v
to bush and obama's secretary of defense bob gates who said this: "it seems to me that trying to speak with one voice, one american voice, has become a quaint thing of the past. i regret that enormously. and so do i. there's nothing more frightening to our enemy than a strong, united voice. it's incumbent upon his political rivals to encourage him privately, not provide political broadsides in public. there's going to be a lot of time to do that during the political campaigns but for now washington leaders should measure their words a bit more carefully because, richard, not on is the whole world watching, vladimir putin is watching. do you agree with secretary gates and myself that you can disagree with the president of the united states, the commander in chief without going out making extreme political broadsides? >> absolutely. what makes it more relevant here, i may be in a minority, but i don't think vladimir putin had in his closet a 16-point plan for ukraine. i think he's improvising and making it up as he's going along, looking for opportunities, playing off what it is we say a
an occupation when these are self-defense forces? these are not russian." that really dampened hopes of any meaningful progress. at least they've talked, and at least it has gone on longer than we thought. the other big news, of course, is the e.u. weighing in with a big financial package, offering $15 billion worth of aid. that comes after yesterday's announcement of a billion dollars of -- of loan guarantees from the u.s. the priority, aside from calming down the security situation in crimea, is, of course, to try and stabilize the ukrainian economy which is in a terrible way with the russians turning the screws still more. the finance ministry here have been frank. they say we've got no money left. the coffers are empty, it's been stolen. also in the east, we've seen more violence, clashes between pro-russian protesters and supporters of the ukrainian government. we've had the -- the government offices there occupied first by the pro-russians, pushed out, and then the pro-ukrainians. and now again today, the pro-russians taking control of that building and putting their flag up. so a pre
in defense of russian interests and russian citizens and the mobilization of forces around the black sea fleet was something people have foreseen for some time. >> i'm going to ask you to sort of read the mind a little bit of vladimir putin, of what sort of his end game might be. what do you suppose putin is up to here? is his goal simply to keep ukraine from falling under the sphere of the european union as opposed to russia, or do you think there's some bigger game that would have ripple effects both to the union and to the u.s.? >> there is a critical goal you just laid out, which is that the new government in ukraine, the weak new government and successive governments after it are not in the best position to have a close association with the eu, which is one of the things that triggered this in the first place. putin also does not want to see ukraine pick up the idea again of joining nato, for example, and there's also a strong signaling factor to all the countries around russia in the neighborhood, not just to ukraine, but also to moldova, georgia, and all of the other countries who
has been widely speculated to run for the presidency. he must vacate the position of defense minister in order to run. this week an army backed government made the surprise announcement that it resigned en masse. staying in egypt, a court sentenced 26 people to death this thursday. according to judicial sources they were conveyed it of plotting attacks on ships passing through the suez canal. reports say the defendants were try out -- tried in apps and shia. violence is been on the increase in egypt over the recent years, in particular an islamic -- hasncy has grown up swelled up. expelled three venezuelan this look -- did lament in response to similar action against u.s.-backed and. venezuela's president nicolas maduro expelled three american diplomats february 17 singing it was supporting opposition plots to overthrow him. the development comes after the venezuelan government gets ready to host an international peace conference to address antigovernment unrest. >> a press conference -- and heay, with capriles said he did not want to turn up, did not want to show his face to nicolas
, the highest award the department of defense can give to a nonunformed person. so, "operation paperclip." to understand, you really must go back to the fall of 1944, and it was a very dark time. this is a map from william shyer's rise and fall of the third rescue -- reich, and we're pushing toward berlin, and among the soldiers are scientists with the u.s. military, and they're part of a secret mission called "operation alsos" and the mission was find a, b, c, weapons, atomic, biological, and chemical weapons, and the real threat at the time was atomic weapons. but very quickly samuel goodsman, the head of the operation, a party -- a particle physicist, the learned, sitting in the abandoned apartment of one of the scientists in november of 1944, that the atomic program was nothing that we thought it was. and the reason was, because, as hitler told his minister of armaments, atomic science is jewish science so let's not concentrate on that. i'm paraphrasing but you get the idea. hitler was interested in biological weapons and what goosman learned was reich was experimenting with these we
reactions as well as the finnish defense minister. >> that will do it for "countdown." ' we'll see you tomorrow, everyone. have a great day. . >> welcome to "on the move." i am manus cranny. bloomberg's european headquarters in london. moments for the start of european trading. our team has everything covered. here with me now is jon ferro. david tweed is also standing by. john, let's kick it off with you. the ukraine situation. the russian markets are beginning to react. >> some of the biggest drop since 2009. every single stock on that index is heading lower. the russian central bank, a little surprise for us. they will cut rates. they said that increase is intended to prevent inflation. i will tell you what it does not present. that is political risk. it is a big deal. >> some of the companies. rom produce a lot of gas for the european region. that is under pressure. let's turn our attention into david tweed. he is in berlin. of course, the european ministers are meeting. is, how faruestion will they be prepared to go? last night that the u.s. treasury secretary have spoken about th
. the latest ultimatum coming to according to ukraine's defense ministry from russia's black sea fleet, saying if ukrainian bases don't evacuate by 5:00 p.m. local time, they will storm them, russian troops will storm them. given that most people acree at this point, russia has complete operational control over crimea, it is not clear what this latest escalation will accomplish. but it is also not clear from what we've been seeing what the endgame here is for russia. it is bizarre that it is almost old news that russian troops fanned out across crimea and surrounding ukrainian military bases. we're hearing disturbingly about other bases in eastern ukraine where russian flags are hosted in eastern ukraine. pro-russians took over a floor of a main administrative building. >> those who are in crimea and if they present any legal and i would raise it again, any legal power in crimea, they try to squeeze ukrainian efforts, come to seize ukrainian property, tried to disarm the ukrainian army. >> reporter: there has been tough talk from western leaders like brit intaken's foreign -- britain's foreign
doing massachusetts. the same day that massachusetts came out, this court decided environmental defense versus duke which decided -- even when a defined term is construed a particular way, it doesn't mean the same term can be construed differently where context -- cannot be construed differently where context requires. that is why massachusetts, after indeed holding that the definition of pollutant included greenhouse gases, didn't go there -- stop there. it asked whether applying it to the title ii provisions on motor vehicles would yield extreme measures or counterintuitive results. only then did they direct the epa to apply the definition. they understood that the literal definition of pollutant was sufficiently broad that it should not be applied without some additional analysis of the context of the provisions. >> what else does it cover other than the -- mobile vehicles? >> there are multiple places where it appears in the act. they have interpreted the words, any air pollutant to mean any subset of the pollutants that this definition -- >> that is because the section that it is i
as a government, you need to put it to a good purpose either enhancing productivity or providing defense or essential services. the u.s. has the advantage of being a reserve currency country. we can issue treasuries at low interest rates. that is essentially what supports our fiscal -- >> we could talk all morning about fiscal multipliers. unfortunately, mr. putin is speaking in russia. i believe he is in his residence. he is looking casual this morning. >> you can't beat some of these headlines -- >> he has his shirt on. >> that is an exclusive. clarida takes a shot at putin. >> a tie and jacket for mr. putin. bc is he met with the d'amico meth and he -- he says he with viktor yanukovich and he is alive. he has no sympathy for him. take a look at the features. your cohorts in crime suggest, do we just ignore all of this ukraine chat? >> the reality is, there is no serious prospect of the u.s. or nato escalating this. as tragic as it is for the ukrainian people, it looks as though it is now not going to become a larger geopolitical impact. that is why you see the markets rebounding. >> i
of troops, but spend more money. don't cut the defense budget. spend the same amount of money. spend more money developing the technologies, the infrastructure. >> pay them more? >> so that we don't have to worry about 2.3 million troops in china or a million troops in iran. that won't matter if we have the baddest, the strongest, smartest, and the best equipped for the next big cyberwar, the next war. >> why don't we stop building tanks? the last tank battle was -- >> no, it wasn't. we had them in desert storm. >> anks. >> that's why they surrendered, bob. >> remember baghdad, bob. they were saying there were no tanks and the tanks were behind them. >> baghdad bob. >> here's the problem, and bob, i would hope you would join me on this. you should be concerned because right now if we do these cuts, we're going to be heavily re reliant on the technological edge over places like china that they're narrowing in on. that's the problem. if you rely on that, they're not honest on what they're doing or their spending or what the new developments are. as you pointed out, they like the borrow othe
's defense ministry meeting. he said he is concerned about developments in crimea. he is urging russia not to take any action, to escalate tension or create misunderstanding. we can join now as he addresses the press. >> the timing of this exercise and the yon going events in ukraine as regards the wording in our decoration on full respect for sovereignty, independence, integrity, this is actually not new language from our sides. this is language you will find in the founding documents that established the nato/ukraine commission. so we just used this opportunity to repeat what we said many years ago in our founding documents. >> japanese media. >> yesterday you mentioned ukraine. you said most important security issues in europe. understanding that, i would like to have a very simple question. how much is the nato concerned about the possible russian intervention in that area? >> we have no information indicating that russia hosni plans to interview militarily. in my statement today, i have been very balanced and urged all parties on all sides to not take steps that can escalate the s
legitimate concerns of russian speaking people. people's brigade for self-defense has been establish who'd had already to curb attempts for forcible take over administrative building in crimea and bringing weapons and ammunition on to the peninsula. we had information on preparation of new provocative acts through the russian black sea float in ukraine in these situations, the authorities of the republic have asked the presidents of russia to restore calm in crimean it's completely legitimate under russian law, and given the extraordinary situation in ukraine, this threat and the threat to our come -- compatriots, prognosis citizens and the black sea fleet. because of this the president of russia went to the federation asking for the you of armed forces and -- on the first of march, the council of the federation supported this appeal, which we hope will cut off the radicals, and i repeat, we're talking about defending our citizens and ourght, the ri. madam president, today i am also authorized to say the following. the president has received 0 -- of russia has received the following from
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